Coastal Defence Ship Admiral Ushakov

Coastal Defense Ship Admiral Ushakov

Probably one of the few historical vessels operated by the SRN, the SRN Admiral Ushakov is the ship of the same name of the former Imperial Russian Navy.
Built by New Admiralty Shipyards, Saint Petersburg and launched on the 1st of November 1893, she was a member of a class of coastal defence ships.

Admiral Ushakov was part of the Baltic Fleet at the beginning of the Russo-Japanese war. The Ushakov was chosen to form part of Admiral Nikolai Nebogatov’s “Third Pacific Squadron” which was sent out to reinforce Admiral Zinovy Rozhestvensky on his journey to the Far East. The ship was obsolete and was not considered suitable for a voyage to the Pacific. However the Admiralty insisted on including Ushakov and her sister ships General-Admiral Graf Apraxin and Admiral Senyavin to bolster their force. Journeying via the Suez Canal and across the Indian Ocean, they linked up with Rozhestvensky’s fleet off Cam Ranh Bay in Indochina and proceeded together to the Straits of Tsushima.

At the Battle of Tsushima, on 27–28 May 1905, the Ushakov was separated from Nebogatov during the night and fought to the last. She was twice hit below the water line and once above, the blazing wreck being run aground on the evening of 28 May after attempts to scuttle the ship failed.

She remained there until the crew, who miraculously had remained with the ship, managed to extinguish the major fires and made fast temporary repairs to her hull. She was then pulled back to sea and joined by the surviving cruisers Almaz, Oleg and Zhemchug as well as the destroyers Bodry, Grosny and Bravywhere, attempted to limp to the Russian held port of Vladivostok (the cruiser Aurora of later revolutionary fame was the only vessel to actually reach Vladivostok after becoming separated during the night). Due to a combination of bad visibility and navigational error, she missed the port and instead put into the port of Anadyr. It was here that the badly burnt hulk remained until the ‘liberation’ of Sieran on the 17th of October 1905.

All seven badly damaged vessels were inherited by the newly formed Sieranian Republic Navy and provided the sole vessels in the fleet for many years. The Admiral Ushakov had been so badly damaged that her rebuild was never completed entirely with one of the biggest distinguishing features being the merging of her funnels into a single aft stack.
She served as the flagship of the fleet until she was replaced by new-built vessels and as of 1938 still existed as an ammunition hulk.

 

Coastal Defence Ship Admiral Ushakov

Coastal Defense Ship Admiral Ushakov

Admiral Ushakov, Russia Coastal Defense ship laid down 1892

Displacement:
4,479 t light; 4,717 t standard; 4,967 t normal; 5,167 t full load

Dimensions: Length (overall / waterline) x beam x draught (normal/deep)
(290.42 ft / 286.42 ft) x 52.00 ft x (19.36 / 20.00 ft)
(88.52 m / 87.30 m) x 15.85 m x (5.90 / 6.10 m)

Armament:
4 – 10.00″ / 254 mm 45.0 cal guns – 504.26lbs / 228.73kg shells, 99 per gun
Breech loading guns in deck and hoist mounts, 1891 Model
2 x Twin mounts on centreline, evenly spread
4 – 4.70″ / 119 mm 45.0 cal guns – 52.36lbs / 23.75kg shells, 200 per gun
Quick firing guns in casemate mounts, 1892 Model
4 x Single mounts on sides, evenly spread
4 raised mounts
10 – 1.50″ / 38.1 mm 5.0 cal guns – 1.46lbs / 0.66kg shells, 600 per gun
Quick firing guns in deck mounts, 1892 Model
10 x Single mounts on sides, evenly spread
10 raised mounts
Weight of broadside 2,241 lbs / 1,017 kg
Main Torpedoes
4 – 15.0″ / 381 mm, 17.00 ft / 5.18 m torpedoes – 0.329 t each, 1.314 t total
In 2 sets of deck mounted carriage/fixed tubes

Armour:
– Belts: Width (max) Length (avg) Height (avg)
Main: 10.0″ / 254 mm 187.46 ft / 57.14 m 8.65 ft / 2.64 m
Ends: 6.00″ / 152 mm 98.94 ft / 30.16 m 8.65 ft / 2.64 m
Upper: 4.50″ / 114 mm 187.46 ft / 57.14 m 8.00 ft / 2.44 m
Main Belt covers 101 % of normal length

– Gun armour: Face (max) Other gunhouse (avg) Barbette/hoist (max)
Main: 8.00″ / 203 mm 8.00″ / 203 mm 7.50″ / 191 mm
2nd: 6.00″ / 152 mm – –

– Armoured deck – multiple decks:
For and Aft decks: 3.00″ / 76 mm
Forecastle: 2.00″ / 51 mm Quarter deck: 2.00″ / 51 mm

– Conning towers: Forward 8.00″ / 203 mm, Aft 0.00″ / 0 mm

Machinery:
Coal fired boilers, complex reciprocating steam engines,
Direct drive, 2 shafts, 5,120 ihp / 3,820 Kw = 16.00 kts
Range 2,290nm at 10.00 kts
Bunker at max displacement = 450 tons (100% coal)

Complement:
295 – 384

Cost:
£0.483 million / $1.933 million

Distribution of weights at normal displacement:
Armament: 457 tons, 9.2 %
– Guns: 455 tons, 9.2 %
– Weapons: 2 tons, 0.0 %
Armour: 2,074 tons, 41.8 %
– Belts: 1,214 tons, 24.4 %
– Armament: 247 tons, 5.0 %
– Armour Deck: 562 tons, 11.3 %
– Conning Tower: 50 tons, 1.0 %
Machinery: 913 tons, 18.4 %
Hull, fittings & equipment: 1,019 tons, 20.5 %
Fuel, ammunition & stores: 488 tons, 9.8 %
Miscellaneous weights: 15 tons, 0.3 %
– Hull above water: 15 tons

Overall survivability and seakeeping ability:
Survivability (Non-critical penetrating hits needed to sink ship):
3,388 lbs / 1,537 Kg = 6.8 x 10.0 ” / 254 mm shells or 4.1 torpedoes
Stability (Unstable if below 1.00): 1.25
Metacentric height 2.8 ft / 0.9 m
Roll period: 13.0 seconds
Steadiness – As gun platform (Average = 50 %): 52 %
– Recoil effect (Restricted arc if above 1.00): 0.43
Seaboat quality (Average = 1.00): 1.04

Hull form characteristics:
Hull has a flush deck,
a ram bow and a cruiser stern
Block coefficient (normal/deep): 0.603 / 0.607
Length to Beam Ratio: 5.51 : 1
‘Natural speed’ for length: 16.92 kts
Power going to wave formation at top speed: 50 %
Trim (Max stability = 0, Max steadiness = 100): 50
Bow angle (Positive = bow angles forward): 0.00 degrees
Stern overhang: 1.00 ft / 0.30 m
Freeboard (% = length of deck as a percentage of waterline length):
Fore end, Aft end
– Forecastle: 19.73 %, 9.00 ft / 2.74 m, 9.00 ft / 2.74 m
– Forward deck: 30.00 %, 9.00 ft / 2.74 m, 9.00 ft / 2.74 m
– Aft deck: 28.97 %, 9.00 ft / 2.74 m, 9.00 ft / 2.74 m
– Quarter deck: 21.30 %, 9.00 ft / 2.74 m, 9.50 ft / 2.90 m
– Average freeboard: 9.05 ft / 2.76 m
Ship tends to be wet forward

Ship space, strength and comments:
Space – Hull below water (magazines/engines, low = better): 96.5 %
– Above water (accommodation/working, high = better): 63.0 %
Waterplane Area: 10,924 Square feet or 1,015 Square metres
Displacement factor (Displacement / loading): 85 %
Structure weight / hull surface area: 80 lbs/sq ft or 392 Kg/sq metre
Hull strength (Relative):
– Cross-sectional: 0.70
– Longitudinal: 1.48
– Overall: 0.75
Caution: Hull subject to strain in open-sea
Adequate machinery, storage, compartmentation space
Cramped accommodation and workspace room

0 Comments

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *